Prostate cancer risk drivers identified

10/1/2014

Prostate cancer growth and metastasis depends on a particular genome variant, according to new research which can improve understanding of prostate cancer risk. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in men worldwide.

The human genome is mainly identical throughout the human population worldwide. However, millions of small variations or polymorphisms, often located in a single nucleotide, can be found between individuals.

These variations are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Using DNA samples from tens of thousands of prostate cancer patients and healthy men, comparative genetic studies, known as genome-wide association studies, have identified dozens of SNPs associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

However, because most of these SNPs are not found in the protein-coding regions of the genome, finding the genes that contribute to the risk of prostate cancer is difficult. For this reason, the question of how these single nucleotide genetic variations or SNPs lead to a risk of prostate cancer has not yet been answered.

 

Source: Science Daily: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140110102643.htm

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